A brief history

1960s
The development of health insurance in New Zealand effectively transformed the private hospital environment. During the 1960s, when the growth of Southern Cross’s insurance business was modest and orderly, there was ample spare capacity in private hospitals.
1970s
During the 1970s, rapid growth put pressure on private hospitals - not just for beds but for theatre facilities and improved quality of equipment and sophisticated care. Southern Cross directors had always taken this matter very seriously - based on a commitment not just to quality, but also availability too. Private hospital patients clearly expected no waiting.
1977
Southern Cross directors formed a completely separate trust capable of managing and operating any hospitals that might approach them for finance and management expertise. The new Southern Cross Hospital Trust (later renamed Southern Cross Health Trust) was registered in 1977.
1979
Southern Cross Hospitals was effectively established as the assets and land of first hospital, the Lavington Hospital in Auckland, was acquired, In 1980, a new hospital costing over $3 million was approved in Auckland to replace the Lavington Hospital.
1981
Christchurch hospital in Bealey Avenue was added to Southern Cross’ portfolio of properties. With significant developments starting in the late 1990’s, Christchurch has grown to become our largest campus in the country.
1982
Northcote Hospital in Palmerston North was transferred to the Southern Cross Hospital Trust, this hospital merged with Aorangi hospital in 2012 and in 2013 it became known as Crest Hospital.
1983
Investments in land and building projects in Tauranga and agreement to purchase of St Andrews Hospital in Rotorua signaled the first steps to development of more facilities across New Zealand. Southern Cross Tauranga merged with the Norfolk Community Trust to form a Joint Venture in 2001, and then in 2007, the combined business moved to a new Hospital facility in Oropi (Grace Hospital). Southern Cross Rotorua merged with QE Hospital in 2007. This partnership saw the successful development of a significantly improved private hospital facility in 2009, and then became a wholly owned Southern Cross Hospital in 2012.
1984
The Iona Trust Hospital in New Plymouth was acquired.
1986
Land purchased on Auckland’s North Shore is the first step to a future hospital development on Wairau Road. With recent land acquisitions and ongoing developments, our North Harbour Hospital site will be a significant private health campus well into the future.
1988
Land purchased in Wellington is the first step to a hospital development there, with our hospital in Welllington now developed into a significant private hospital facility.
1992
Projects involving development in Napier, Invercargill and Wanganui progress.
2000
Brightside’s new, high tech hospital is re-opened on the Epsom site in Auckland.
2001
Our Gillies Hospital joint venture was formed, based on Gilles Avenue. Run as a very successful partnership, it became a wholly-owned Southern Cross hospital in 2014.
2005
Auckland Surgical Centre, a successful purpose-built day stay hospital was purchased by Southern Cross Hospitals.
2007
Ormiston Hospital, a new private hospital development was built in South East Auckland.
2010
The Southern Endoscopy Centre, a joint venture with medical specialists, opened for business on Southern Cross’ Christchurch hospital campus.
2013
Another new joint venture is formed, involving Nelson's Manuka Street Hospital.
2016
Southern Cross Hospitals forms a joint venture partnership with TBI Health, a specialist in injury management and rehabilitation services.
Today
Southern Cross Hospitals’ network of 10 wholly-owned hospitals and joint venture facilities (including 4 surgical hospitals and a range of specialist treatment centres) has developed to meet increased level of healthcare need for New Zealanders. Around 1,000 surgeons and anaesthetists are credentialled to operate across the Southern Cross network in safe, modern hospitals with access to sophisticated modern medical technology.